URBAN RIGGER: FLOATING SHIPPING CONTAINER HOUSING FOR STUDENTS IN DENMARK BY BJARKE INGELS GROUP

The architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) in partnership with Urban Rigger founder Kim Loudrop have created Urban Rigger v 1.0, a floating, affordable student-housing structure made from recycled shipping containers.

Located on the Copenhagen harbour, the Urban Rigger introduces a building typology optimized for harbor cities with great potential for expansion to create not just units of housing by entire floating communities for students. The use of shipping containers offers a construction framework that flexible, modular and cost effective seeing as they are readily available.

Here’s a description culled from the Urban Rigger website,

An URBAN RIGGER is a unique design for a floating, flexible, C02 neutral and mobile property totaling 680 sqm, which is spread over;

  • 300 sqm of housing (9 + 3 individual student residence at respectively. 23sqm – 27sqm),
  • a 160 sqm common green courtyard,
  • Kayak landing, Bathing platform, BBQ area,
  • as well as a 65 sqm communal roof terrace.
  • Downstairs below sea level, the 230 sqm pontoon (basement), Comprising: 12 storage rooms, technical room and common fully automated laundry.

By stacking 9 container units in a circle, we can create 12 studio residences which frame a centralized winter garden; this is used as a common meeting place for students.

Bjarke Ingels designed URBAN RIGGER using the additional building principles for connectivity and has thus achieved unprecedented flexibility in the floating elements, so that the concept can easily be assembled in floating apartment blocks of varying size as needed and desired in all ports, river and canal intensive cities worldwide.

URBAN RIGGER V1.0

They recently completed their first prototype which is now fully occupied and reported to have a waiting list of over 3000 applicants. There are also plans to develop a 24 unit version which may come later in the year. Here’s a fairly detailed look at the finished product.

CONSTRUCTION IMAGES

Framing out the concrete pontoon
Stacking and assembling the structure

FINAL EXTERIOR


INTERIOR

A VIEW FROM ABOVE

 founder Kim Loudrop have created Urban Rigger v 1.0, a floating, affordable student-housing structure made from recycled shipping containers.

Located on the Copenhagen harbour, the Urban Rigger introduces a building typology optimized for harbor cities with great potential for expansion to create not just units of housing by entire floating communities for students. The use of shipping containers offers a construction framework that flexible, modular and cost effective seeing as they are readily available.

Here’s a description culled from the Urban Rigger website,

An URBAN RIGGER is a unique design for a floating, flexible, C02 neutral and mobile property totaling 680 sqm, which is spread over;

  • 300 sqm of housing (9 + 3 individual student residence at respectively. 23sqm – 27sqm),
  • a 160 sqm common green courtyard,
  • Kayak landing, Bathing platform, BBQ area,
  • as well as a 65 sqm communal roof terrace.
  • Downstairs below sea level, the 230 sqm pontoon (basement), Comprising: 12 storage rooms, technical room and common fully automated laundry.

By stacking 9 container units in a circle, we can create 12 studio residences which frame a centralized winter garden; this is used as a common meeting place for students.

Bjarke Ingels designed URBAN RIGGER using the additional building principles for connectivity and has thus achieved unprecedented flexibility in the floating elements, so that the concept can easily be assembled in floating apartment blocks of varying size as needed and desired in all ports, river and canal intensive cities worldwide.

URBAN RIGGER V1.0

They recently completed their first prototype which is now fully occupied and reported to have a waiting list of over 3000 applicants. There are also plans to develop a 24 unit version which may come later in the year. Here’s a fairly detailed look at the finished product.

CONSTRUCTION IMAGES

Framing out the concrete pontoon
Stacking and assembling the structure

FINAL EXTERIOR


INTERIOR

A VIEW FROM ABOVE